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25 worst dating decisions in mlb List of Major League Baseball records considered unbreakable

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Numero para pedir cita medico junta andalucia's elusive record of back-to-back no-hitters has been described as "the most unbreakable of all baseball records"Pagina de citas nicaragua by Paginas de citas badoo.

The following Site de amizade italiano records are generally considered unlikely to ever be broken. The information is compiled from various sources including sportswriters, players, and fans. Many of these were initially set by either freak occurrences of greatness or during the early decades of baseball when certain rules, techniques, and fundamentals were in place that have since drastically evolved, making it almost impossible to replicate such feats in today's game.

25 worst dating decisions in mlb Pitching records[Free online dating site in asia] List of Major League Baseball records considered unbreakable

Most career wins – 511[Online dating lots of views no messages]

Set by Peta dancing with the stars dating, 1890–1911.Php dating websites free best christianPreeya kalidas and marc elliott dating in real lifeScout online dating sites in india for free Highlights include five 30-Sti dating site australia for 10free seasons and fifteen 20-win seasons.Talambuhay ng dating pangulong corazon aquino The next closest player is Tips for successful dating and relationships, with 94 fewer wins at 417; he was the only other player to have reached 400.Tips on dating a mexican girl The most wins by a pitcher who played his entire career in the post-1920 What are some free christian dating sites is 's 363.

For a player to accomplish this, he would have to average 25 wins in 20 seasons just to get to 500. In the past 38 years, only 3 pitchers ( in , in 1990, and in ) have had one season with 25 wins. Between 2000 and 2009, the Major League leader finished each year with an average of 21. The pitcher with the most career wins during the 2015 season (222 wins), , retired, making 43-year-old the active leader entering the 2016 season, with 218 wins.

Most wins in a season – 59[]

Set by , in 1884. Most pitchers in today's game start 30–35 games per season, and thus do not start enough games to break the record. The most games started by a pitcher in the 2014 season was 34, accomplished by six pitchers. This means that even if a pitcher were to win every game started in this scenario, he would still fall 25 wins short of tying Radbourn's record. Although relief pitchers often in more than the requisite number of games, they rarely record ten wins in a season. To put this record in further perspective, the last pitcher to win 30 games in a season was in 1968 and the last pitcher to win 25 games in a season was in 1990. Also, the most wins in a season by any pitcher in the 21st century is 24, by in 2002 and in 2011; no other pitcher in this era has had more than 23 in a season.

Most career complete games – 749[]

Set by , 1890–1911. Highlights of this record include: nine 40- seasons, eighteen 30-complete-game seasons and completing 92 percent of his total career starts (815). The next closest player is , who has 103 fewer complete games at 646. Among pitchers whose entire careers were in the live-ball era, the most is 382 by Warren Spahn.

For a player to accomplish this, he would have to average 30 complete games over 25 seasons to get to 750. Between 2000 and 2009, the Major League leaders in complete games averaged 8 per season, and only one pitcher in the 21st century has had 10 complete games in any season (James Shields, with 11 in 2011). The closest active player is the 35-year-old with 38 complete games.

has the most career shutouts, a record nobody is likely to break.

The quest for any complete-game records, either over a career or over a single season, is further complicated by the drastic change in philosophy embraced by virtually all modern managers and pitching coaches, motivated in roughly equal parts by more advanced modern-day medical knowledge of the cumulative damage that pitching does to a hurler's arm, combined with a team front office's reluctance to see a pitcher in whom they have invested considerable financial capital in the form of a big contract getting hurt. Another factor, arguably, is the greater reliance of managers and pitching coaches on —in this case, statistical data and analysis that generally show leaving a starter in longer leads to diminishing returns in terms of opposing batters allowed to reach base safely and score runs. While even a few decades ago, a starting pitcher was expected to go out and attempt to pitch a complete game, with the manager going to his bullpen only if the starter ran into trouble or was injured or visibly tiring, the present-day norm is the starter is expected to give his manager six, or perhaps seven "quality innings," at which point the manager—who, along with the pitching coach, has been tracking the starter's pitch count—will normally lift him and bring in one or more middle-relief specialists to pitch the next several innings and form a bridge to the team's closer. There are exceptions—a manager will leave a starter in who is working on a no-hitter or, sometimes, a shutout, or will let a starter continue if he is pitching particularly strongly and has not run up a high pitch count. But managerial caution is now a more dominant mode, particularly if a pitcher is coming off a recent injury or has had or any other major procedure done on his pitching arm.

Most complete games in a season – 75[]

All-time record of 75 set by in 1879; modern-era record of 48 set by in . Sports Illustrated has said about this record, "Even if the bar is lowered to begin with the Live Ball era (which began in 1920), the mark would still be untouchable." The most complete games recorded in a live-ball season is 33, achieved twice at the dawn of that era—by in and in . According to SI, modern starters can expect to start about 34 games in a season.

Most career shutouts – 110[]

Set by , 1907–27. Highlights include: eleven 6- seasons and leading the league in shutouts 7 times. The next closest player is , who has 20 fewer shutouts at 90. As is the case for career wins and complete games, Warren Spahn holds the record among pitchers whose entire careers were in the live-ball era, with 63.

For a player to tie Johnson's record, he would have to pitch 5 shutouts every season for 22 years. Between 2000 and 2009 the Major League leader in shutouts finished each year with an average of 4. The closest active player is Colón with 13.

Most consecutive no-hitters – 2[]

Set by on June 11 and 15, 1938. Despite holding this record, he finished his career with a 119–121 . The prospect of a pitcher breaking this record by hurling three consecutive is so unimaginable that described this as "the most unbreakable of all baseball records." came the closest to matching Vander Meer after following up a no-hitter with eight no-hit innings in 1947. In 1988, of the had consecutive no-hitters going with two outs in the ninth; both were broken up by singles. Between 2000 and 2009, 20 no-hitters were pitched, and the closest anyone came in the 21st century is , who in 2015 threw a one-hitter and no-hitter in consecutive starts, respectively losing out on perfect games in the seventh inning and on the 27th batter.

holds records in career no-hitters, strikeouts and bases on balls. Given the fact that he pitched a record 27 years in MLB, all three records are regarded by many sportswriters as unlikely to ever be surpassed.

Most career no-hitters – 7[]

Set by , 1966–93. is second with 4 no-hitters. No other pitcher has tossed more than three no hitters. Between 2000 and 2009 there were 20 no-hitters. Only 32 pitchers have thrown 2 or more no-hitters, and of the 18 active pitchers that have thrown a no-hitter, only six have pitched more than one (, , , , , and have each pitched two no-hitters).

Most career strikeouts – 5,714[]

Set by Nolan Ryan, 1966–93. Highlights include: six 300- seasons, fifteen 200-strikeout seasons, and leading the league in strikeouts 11 times. To accomplish this record, Ryan played the most seasons (27) in MLB history.

The next closest player is , who has 839 fewer strikeouts at 4,875. Johnson also had four consecutive 300-strikeout seasons at the turn of the 21st century (1999–2002); the only pitcher with a 300-strikeout season after 2002 is , who had 301 in 2015. For a player to approach this record, he would have to average 225 strikeouts over 25 seasons just to get to 5,625. Averaging 250 strikeouts over 23 seasons would enable him to surpass the record with 5,750. Between 2000 and 2009 the Major League leader in strikeouts finished each year with an average of 287, and even that average is skewed with large strikeout seasons by and early in the decade. No pitcher exceeded 270 strikeouts between 2005 and 2012, and only five pitchers have done so since 2013 ( with 277 in 2013; with 271 in 2014; and three in 2015, Kershaw, Scherzer with 276, and with 274). The closest active player is Sabathia, with 2,574 strikeouts.

Most career bases on balls – 2,795[]

Set by Nolan Ryan, 1966–93. Ryan ended up with 50 percent more than any other pitcher in history. The next closest is Steve Carlton with 1,833. The only active player with as many as 1,000 is , with 1,100 at the end of the 2015 season.

Most career saves – 652[]

Set by , 1995–2013. Highlights include 15 consecutive seasons with 25 or more , 9 consecutive seasons with 30 or more saves and 15 seasons with 30 or more saves (all three are records). After , who retired with 601 career saves, the next-closest pitcher in saves is , with 478.

For a player to reach Rivera's record, he would have to earn an average of 35 saves for 17 consecutive seasons just to get to 595 saves or 40 saves for 16 consecutive years to reach 640. As of the end of the 2015 season, the closest active player is 34-year-old , who has 386 saves and is 266 saves behind.

25 worst dating decisions in mlb Hitting records[] List of Major League Baseball records considered unbreakable

's record of 4,256 hits is considered unsurpassable.

Most career hits – 4,256[]

Set by , 1963–86. With the retirement of at the end of the 2014 season with 3,465 hits, the active MLB leader becomes the 40-year-old , who had 3,084 as of May 4, 2016. To get within 6 of tying Rose, a player would have to collect 250 hits over 17 consecutive seasons, or more than 200 hits over the course of 21 seasons. In the past 81 years, only has topped 250 hits in a season (with 262 hits in 2004). As of the end of the 2015 season, Ichiro has 2,935 major league hits and 1,278 hits in the Japanese major leagues for a combined, unofficial total of 4,213. At the same time, (33-year-old) has 2,331 hits after 13 seasons; he would have to average 193 hits over 10 additional seasons to break the record.

Most consecutive seasons with 200 hits – 10[]

Set by , who attained this from 2001–10. Ichiro's honors since joining the from at age 27 include winning the 2001 AL Rookie of the Year and MVP awards, claiming the in 2001 and 2004, leading the AL in hits in seven seasons (2001, 2004, 2006–10) and breaking 's 84-year-old single-season hits record in 2004 with 262 hits. The closest player is who had 8 consecutive seasons with 200 hits that occurred almost a century prior in the . Only , with two consecutive 200-hit seasons, entered the 2016 season with a current streak of even two such seasons.

Most career triples – 309[]

Set by , 1899–1916. Highlights include: five 20- seasons and sixteen 10-triple seasons. The next closest player is , who has 14 fewer triples at 295. Because of changes in playing styles and conditions that began around 1920 and have continued into the present from the to the , the number of triples hit has declined noticeably since then. Among hitters whose entire careers were in the live-ball era, the leader in career triples is , with 177.

For a player to threaten Crawford's record, he would have to average 15 triples over 20 seasons just to get to 300. Between 2000 and 2009 the Major League leader in triples finished each year with an average of 17. The closest active player is , with 122.

Most triples in a season – 36[]

Set by in 1912. Only two other players have ever had 30 triples in a season ( with 31 in 1886 and with 31 in 1894), while the closest anyone has come in the century since Wilson set the record is 26, shared by Sam Crawford (1914) and (1925). Only six hitters have had 20 triples in the last 50 years: (20 in 1979), (21 in 1985), (21 in 1996), (20 in 2000), (23 in 2007) and (20 in 2007).

Most grand slams in a single inning – 2[]

Set by in 1999. Only twelve other players have ever hit two grand slams in a single game. However, breaking the record would require a player to hit three grand slams in a single inning. Over 50 players have hit two home runs in a single inning, but no MLB player has so much as hit three home runs in one inning. However, one minor league player, , has achieved the feat of hitting three home runs in a single inning.

's career batting average of .366 is viewed as unbreakable.

Highest career batting average – .366[]

Set by in 1928 after beginning his career in 1905. Highlights of this record include; three .400 seasons, nine .380 seasons, leading the league 11 times in . Cobb managed to hit .323 in his final season at age 41. The next closest player is who had a batting average of .358; Hornsby's career straddled the dead-ball and live-ball eras, with most of it being in the live-ball era. There are only 3 players with a career average over .350, and the highest batting average among those who played their entire careers in the live-ball era is ' .344. Since 1928, there have been only 46 seasons in which a hitter reached .366 and only attained that mark at least four times, finishing with a career .338 batting average. The active player with the highest batting average is Miguel Cabrera at .321.

Most RBI in a single season - 191[]

Set by , who batted in 191 runs in 1930. Only and , at 183 and 184, ever came close and there have been no real challenges to the record for over 75 years.

Highest career on-base percentage – .482[]

Set by from 1939 to 1960. Williams, the last man to hit .400 in a MLB season (.406 in ), won six American League batting titles, two , and two MVP awards. He ended his career with 521 home runs and a .344 career batting average. Williams achieved these numbers and honors despite missing nearly five full seasons to military service and injuries. The next-closest player in career OBP is at .474.

Since Williams' retirement, only four players have posted an OBP above .482 in a season, with the only one to do so more than once. Bonds ended his career with an OBP of .444; the leader among active players is , at .423.

Longest hitting streak – 56 games[]

"With pitching the way it is—specialty guys, closer and setup guys—you’re not going to have a chance to get four at-bats against one guy. On one night, you might face four different guys. I'm still amazed DiMaggio got to 56. I’m amazed now when somebody gets to 30."

— , who set the record of hitting in 58 consecutive games

Set by , 1941. Highlights include a .404 batting average and 91 hits. DiMaggio's achievement is such a statistical aberration in its unlikelihood that called it "the most extraordinary thing that ever happened in American sports". The next closest player is , who had a of 11 fewer games at 45 over 2 seasons. There have been only six 40-game hitting streaks, the most recent one occurring in 1978, when hit in 44 straight games. This also marked the only time since 1941 that a player has reached a 40-game hitting streak. Since 1900, no player other than DiMaggio has ever hit safely in 55 of 56 games and no active players (as of 2011) have their two longest career hit streaks even add up to 56 games. The improbability of DiMaggio's hit streak ever being broken has been attributed to the increased use of the bullpen and specialist relievers. After his 56th game, DiMaggio was walked in the next game and then went another 16 games with a hit.

25 worst dating decisions in mlb Other records[] List of Major League Baseball records considered unbreakable

Most consecutive games played – 2,632[]

Set by , 1982–98. The next closest player is , who had a of 502 fewer games at 2,130. Third on the all-time list is , whose streak of 1,307 consecutive games is less than half of Ripken's total. Only seven players have ever played more than 1,000 consecutive games. For a player to approach the milestone, he would have to play all 162 games in a season for 16 years just to get to 2,592 games.

As stated by , "no one else has ever come close, and no one ever will." It is important to note, however, that before Gehrig's record was broken by Ripken in 1995, it was Gehrig's record that was considered unbreakable. In his 1988 edition of "The Baseball Abstract", author Bill James stated (page 203) that "...Gehrig's record is vulnerable precisely because human characteristics such as determination and the ability to play with pain can be applied to breaking it... I expect Gehrig's (2,130) record to be broken in my lifetime". At that time, Ripken was more than seven years away from the record.

Most career stolen bases – 1,406[]

Set by , 1979–2003. Highlights include: three 100- seasons, thirteen 50-stolen-base seasons, and leading the league in stolen bases 12 times. The next closest player is , who has 468 fewer stolen bases at 938. According to , the stolen base record is probably unbreakable, as it is hard to imagine a player today "even attempt so many steals." For a player to approach Henderson's milestone, he would have to average 70 stolen bases over 20 seasons just to get to 1,400. Between 2000 and 2009, the Major League leader in stolen bases finished each year with an average of 64. The closest active player is Ichiro with 500 stolen bases.

Most All-Star Games played – 25[]

Set by , 1954–76. Aaron was an in all but two of the 23 seasons he played in the major leagues (his debut year in 1954 and last season in 1976). His record total was assisted by MLB's decision to hold two All-Star Games from 1959–1962; Aaron played in all eight All-Star Games during that period. The only players whose careers began after 1976 to play in 25 MLB seasons were Rickey Henderson, who appeared on 10 Midsummer Classic rosters, and , who appeared in one All-Star Game. The active player with the most All-Star Game selections is , who has been on 14 All-Star Game rosters after 21 seasons.

Most wins, losses and games managed – 3,731, 3,948 and 7,755[]

Set by , who retired in 1950. Mack managed the for 50 years until the age of 87, partly aided by the fact that he owned the team as well. The closest manager to Mack in games managed and losses is (with 5,097 and 2,365, respectively). is second in wins with 2,763. No active manager is within the top 15 in games or wins, or in the top 10 in losses. The closest active manager is (age 61) who has 1,702 wins, 1,682 losses and 3,384 games managed.

Most road losses, season[]

The currently hold the MLB record for the most road losses in a single season, with 101. Unless the season is extended, no team can play more than 81 road games in a single season, meaning it is impossible to break the record. The team also holds the record for the most losses in a single MLB season (with 134), which is technically possible to break, but no team has come within 15 losses of this mark since the .

Two other factors contribute to the uniqueness of the Spiders' record:

  • In 1899, owners were allowed to own more than one team, and in the case of the Spiders, the owners also owned the . Believing it more profitable to have a good team in St. Louis, the Spiders' best players from 1898 were given to the Perfectos in exchange for their least desirable players. The MLB rules now prohibit a single owner owning more than one team, so this arrangement could not happen.
  • Baseball teams were much more dependent on gate receipts to make money back then than they are today, so as the season wore on and the crowds in Cleveland shrunk in comparison to the mounting losses, prospective visitors would refuse to make the trip to Cleveland as their cut of the gate receipts wouldn't allow them to recoup the expenses of the journey. The Spiders were forced to move a lot of their home games into the stadiums of their opponents (after July 1, they only played 8 games at home the rest of the way), giving them the opportunity for 101 road losses (against 11 wins). Today, MLB revenue streams are far more numerous than they were in 1899, and with the collective bargaining agreement allowing some form of revenue sharing, it is extremely unlikely that a team would decide to give up travelling to a specific stadium for financial reasons. Only in extenuating circumstances are home games moved, such as when the forced the to move their home dates against the to Philadelphia, although the Jays were still classified as the "home" team for record-keeping purposes. In 2015, the Baltimore Orioles were forced to move three home games to Tampa Bay due to , but as in the case of the 2010 Blue Jays, the Orioles were still treated as the "home" team for record-keeping purposes.

World Series records[]

records constitute a separate category from regular season records, but here too, structural changes in Major League Baseball over the years have rendered some of these records as most likely unbeatable. Expansion of the major leagues over the years, from the original 16 teams prevalent from 1901 through 1960 to the current 30 teams, and the subsequent division of both the American and National Leagues into two geographic divisions each in 1969 created a multi-tier playoff schedule requiring a team to first win a league championship series in order to advance to the World Series. The subsequent re-division of each league into three geographic divisions in 1994 added a second initial playoff layer, the divisional series, to the mix; a team now had to first win the best-of-five divisional series in order to advance to the best-of-seven league championship series and then win that series to advance to the World Series, creating potential hurdles for any pennant-winning or World Championship team looking to go back to the Fall Classic the next season. Additionally, the legally mandated demise in the 1970s of the binding players to their original teams until traded, released or retirement and its replacement with that allowed star players to sell their services to the highest bidder served to break up winning teams, with the loss of star players reducing those teams' chances for multiple World Series appearances.

Under the previous pre-divisional postseason, pre-free agency system, the were able to appear in 15 World Series in the 18 years between 1947 and 1964, winning 10 of them, including five straight World Championships from 1949-1953, and five consecutive World Series appearances between 1960 and 1964 (though only two World Series championships in that time), a record of success which has not been equaled since, either by the Yankees or anybody else. Since the introduction of free agency, only the 1998-2001 Yankees have managed to reach the World Series over four consecutive years, and only the 1972-1974 and the 1998-2000 Yankees have been able to string together three consecutive World Championship years. The changes brought on by free agency are further illustrated by the 10 seasons between 1978 and 1987 which saw 10 different franchises win the World Series - a streak unprecedented in the sport's history.

The changes have also meant that individual players - while having greater freedom to go to teams that they perceive as possible winners and to be paid more money for doing so - are less likely to be able to play in enough World Series to be able to match or beat long-standing cumulative records, such as 's streak of 33 2/3 consecutive innings without allowing a run that the Yankee pitcher set between 1960 and 1962, or 's 18 World Series home runs that he hit between 1952 and 1964, with both men breaking long-time records previously held by .

Sportswriters and broadcasters, aware of the lessened chances of both teams and individual players being able to play in multiple World Series, have now popularized a new category of "postseason" statistics that frequently lump playoff and World Series records together - but given the disparity in the number of games played (a team winning a five-game division series, a seven-game LCS and playing in a seven-game World Series will have played 19 postseason games in just one season, versus the maximum seven World Series games players could have participated in prior to the expanded playoffs), baseball purists believe comparing the playoffs-inflated "postseason" statistics of modern teams and players with the World Series-only postseason statistics from decades ago is like comparing apples to oranges.

25 worst dating decisions in mlb References[] List of Major League Baseball records considered unbreakable

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25 worst dating decisions in mlb External links[] List of Major League Baseball records considered unbreakable

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